Book Review: Some Mistakes of Darwin and a Programmer’s Theory of Life by Daniel G. Vintner

Book Details:

Author: Daniel G. Vintner
Release Date: 
24th May 2022
Series:
Genre: Non-Fiction, Philosophy
Format: E-book 
Pages: 263 pages
Publisher: Boros Dániel
Blurb:
Darwin’s theory of evolution has been widely regarded as one of the greatest accomplishments of science. Except for a few individuals, most scientists have dismissed the issues that have crept up in the last century related to and in opposition to the theory of evolution. However, developments in molecular biology and genetics have failed to address some of the original concerns with the theory and also exposed even more significant flaws that should not be overlooked.
The evolution debate has been raging on the outskirts of academia for two centuries, and the sides have never been further apart than they are now. “Science versus religion” and “evolution versus creationism” was what the audience heard for a long time. In the twentieth century, God was brought down into the fighting pits of scientific society to duke it out with Charles Darwin, and for the longest time, it seemed he had lost the match for good. In recent times, though, God has put his gloves back on and seems to have managed to insert himself back into the debate.

Or has he? Has anything really changed in this debate, which is as old as debates themselves? Did evolution change, or science, or God himself? What is true from the grandiose claims of those who claim to have resurrected God by virtue of their arguments? And what truth is there in the words of the scientists who claim to have buried him?

Some Mistakes of Darwin goes back to the beginning of evolutionary thought and verifies every claim made by Darwin and his successors. Everything is put to the test, and nothing is off limits. No claim is accepted without verification and no argument is beyond questioning. Travel from the birth of genetics and molecular biology, through the advances in software engineering, to the far ends of space and time and beyond. By the last chapter, the book goes full circle and reaches the same conclusion as the philosophers of old have, from the same facts but a different perspective, arguing from science, not from scripture, for a new theory of life.

Review

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Some Mistakes of Darwin and a Programmer’s Theory of Life by Daniel G. Vintner is a very interesting book to read that will leave you thinking really hard about the age-old debate of ‘science vs religion.’

This book had a very unique premise and to say that I was intrigued by this book would be a huge understatement. After reading the book I was really impressed by the author’s arguments presented in the book and believed them to be true, finding myself leaning toward his explanations and thus, his side, more than I thought was possible. Without giving away any spoilers, I would just like to say that be prepared to be swayed from your one-sided stand after reading this book because the author might just be able to convince you to agree with his arguments.

I would strongly recommend this book to everyone who likes to explore and read about Darwin’s Theory of evolution.


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Book Review: Hold The Apocalypse – Pass Me A Scientist Please, And Other Humorous Essays From An Optimist In Dreamland by Bob Lorentson

Book Details:

Author: Bob Lorentson
Release Date: 
7th October 2021
Genre: Humor, Satire, Science, Philosophy, Psychology
Format: E-book 
Pages: 169 pages
Publisher: Atmosphere Press
Blurb:
A terrified yet occasionally optimistic environmental scientist takes a humorous look at the science behind the human and animal behaviors that make a doomed planet so interesting.
If you’ve ever wanted to get the real dirt on forest bathing without getting muddied, or on animal arsonists without getting burned, or on DIY transcranial Direct Current Stimulation without risking all those excitable neurons that already have one foot out the door, then this is the book for you. Should you be of the type, however, that has found life’s little pleasures interrupted of late by the loud ticking of the Doomsday Clock, put in some earplugs, because it’s not yet too late to have a good laugh while you learn about ‘Cat Research for Dummies,’ ‘Brain Wars – the Gender Variations,’ or ‘Boredom – It’s Not Just for the Boring.’

In these fifty essays, Bob Lorentson humorously uses science, philosophy, psychology, history, and even poetry to examine a myriad of curious subjects while waiting for the collapse of civilization.

Review

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Hold The Apocalypse – Pass Me A Scientist Please, And Other Humorous Essays From An Optimist In Dreamland by Bob Lorentson is a book of essays that are unique, fresh yet, on a deeper level, quite important. These essays are humorous with undertones of various themes such as psychology, philosophy, general sciences, socio-political themes, etc. I enjoyed reading this collection because there was never a dull moment!

The author has a very unique style of writing and his sense of humour appealed to me a lot. I enjoyed each and every essay mostly because aside from the satirical approach and the social commentary, the pieces always had a deeper meaning to them and with each and every essay, the author nailed that bit.

I would highly recommend this book to readers of satire and short-story or essay collections.


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Book Review: The Greatest Game by Greg Rajaram

Author: Greg Rajaram 
Release Date: 15th April 2021
Genre: Philosophy, Drama, Literary Fiction, Surreal
Series:
Format: E-book 
Pages: 242 pages
Publisher: –
Blurb:
Ever since humans became self-aware, we have struggled to find the meaning of life. The price we paid for becoming intelligent was to become painfully ignorant of the difference between good and evil.

Adi, a 10-year-old boy, works together with two old philosophers as they try to unravel the prophecy of a promised King. With insatiable curiosity, Adi must work with the wise men as they rationalize with each other on why and how humans became intelligent. Together they attempt to answer some of the most profound questions related to existence. Does evolution end with human beings or is there an ‘Overman’ who can reach evolution’s pinnacle? Will this Overman be able to define values for humankind?
Centuries later a young boy promises his mother that he will always uphold the love that she has taught him. It is a promise that drowns him in the nectar of the gods. Krish grows up to be an engineer and joins a team of scientists as they try to create artificial consciousness in a machine.
Krish soon realizes that he has a bigger fight on his hands. A fight to preserve love in a desolate world. His quest for true love ultimately leads him down a path where he comes face to face with a fearsome snake delivering a kiss of death.
Humans have come a long way by questioning the nature of objects around us and pushing the limits of our intelligence, but it’s now time that we ask the greatest question yet: when does intelligence transcend to become consciousness?

Review

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The Greatest Game by Greg Rajaram is a philosophical read with complex characters and plotline that will leave you introspecting about life and everything else in its wake.

This book a very fresh take on a concept well-loved and widely accepted therefore it was very interesting to read this book. I liked the author’s narrative style and the fact that the book was layered with complexity, intrigue and knowledge very well. I also liked the characterisation as they were all well-developed and rounded characters.

I’d recommend this book to all readers, especially to readers of philosophical fiction.

You can also read this review on Goodreads and Amazon.

Author Spotlight: Jake Camp

Welcome to TRB Lounge, the section of TRB dedicated to Book Promotions. Today, we are featuring Jake Camp, author of Banshee And The Sperm Whale, for our Author Spotlight feature.

About The Author

Born in Big Timber, Montana in 1973, Jake Camp is the son of an impressionist landscape artist and the grandson of an engineer and inventor.  He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in philosophy from Western Washington University and the University of Montana, and has been a community college professor and department chair since 2002.  An avid fly-fisherman and snowboarder, he lives in Arvada, CO with his sons.

Get in touch with author Jake Camp here:

Website | Goodreads | Facebook | YouTube | Email


Book Trailer


About The Book

A sunset wedding in Kona. An ugly secret discovered on an iPhone. Experimental philosophical marriage counseling. Time travel. Diver Neurons and Angel Neurons separated by Sea and Sky. Banshee and the Sperm Whale takes the reader on a journey into the unconscious mind of Martin, a biracial chef from Denver who suffers from a particular kind of overabundance. Along the way, a modern allegory unfolds, and everyday notions about self-knowledge, the nature of good and evil, and possibility of finding meaning and spiritual significance in the face of inexorable uncertainty are turned inside out.

You can fins Banshee And The Sperm Whale here:

Goodreads | Amazon


If you are an author and wish to be featured as our guest or if you are a publicist and want to get your author/book featured on TRB, then please get in touch directly by e-mail at thereadingbud@gmail.com


ARC Review: Lodestar by Daniel Hagedorn

Author: Daniel Hagedorn 
Release Date: 10th February 2021
Genre: Science-Fiction Fantasy
Series:
Format: E-book 
Pages: 330 pages
Publisher: Atmosphere Press
Blurb:
How do humans survive after a massive pandemic that has devastated the population? Rather than living amid continued chaos and panic, the surviving population enjoys a thriving life thanks to the assistance of the network, a vast system that connects everything and everyone. The network protects from the virus while allowing everyone to lead their best life. Every dream and desire can easily be attained.

14 years into this networked world, David, one of the creators, wakes up to find that he is no longer connected. Is he the only one? And why, for what purpose? David feels almost like waking from a dream only to discover a technologically advanced world, full of beautiful and spectacular things, but all may not be what it seems. What is the difference between a dream and reality? What is the nature of experience?

Follow David as he wanders through a vast maze, uncovering layer upon layer in his search for truth. Recalling his former life, he must choose between what he feels, his natural compulsion to question everything, and what is good for humanity. The Lodestar takes you on a deep look into philosophical questions surrounding technology and its role in humanity.

Review

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Lodestar by Daniel Hagedorn is a riveting new sci-fi fantasy read that will pull you in right from the start and keep you hooked till the very last page. I really liked this book because in spite of being a technological read it had a lot of philosophical threads weaved in throughout the story which made it a very interesting and a thought-provoking read.

I liked the characterisation, vague-ish as the main ones were I really enjoyed reading about them. The writing was good and complemented the plot well. The concept, for me, was a complete win-win, and the plot structuring was good. Overall it is a nice read and I’d highly recommend it to all sci-fi readers who like reading about philosophical themes and fantastical elements.

You can also read this review on Goodreads.